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J Urol. 2006 Jan;175(1):358-64.

Activation of alpha1D adrenergic receptors in the rat urothelium facilitates the micturition reflex.

Author information

1
Department of Neurophysiology, Akita University, School of Medicine, Akita, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Previous studies have revealed that the activation of alpha(1) adrenergic receptors in urothelial cells releases neurotransmitters. We determined if alpha(1D) adrenergic receptors are expressed in the urothelium of the rat bladder and if inhibition of these receptors affects reflex voiding.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Female Wistar rats were used in the experiments. Receptor expression was evaluated by Western blot. The effects of receptor activation were studied using cystometrograms, measurement of adenosine triphosphate concentrations in the bladder lumen and afferent nerve recording. The alpha(1D) antagonist naftopidil (0.75 to 1.66 mg/kg) was administered intravenously into the external jugular vein.

RESULTS:

The expression of alpha(1D) adrenergic receptors was detected in urothelial tissue with Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The alpha(1D) receptor antagonist naftopidil prolonged the intercontraction interval during continuous infusion cystometrograms in conscious rats (143% of the control value) and suppressed the excitatory effect of intravesical infusion of acetic acid (0.1%) on the intercontraction interval (220%). Naftopidil inhibited the bladder afferent nerve activity induced by bladder distention (32.0%) and acetic acid infusion (30.4%), and decreased adenosine triphosphate levels in the bladder perfusate during bladder distention (36.6%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Endogenous catecholamines appear to act on alpha(1D) receptors in the urothelium to facilitate mechanosensitive bladder afferent nerve activity and reflex voiding.

PMID:
16406942
DOI:
10.1016/S0022-5347(05)00016-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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