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Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jan;101(1):110-8.

Hospitalization, surgery, and readmission rates of IBD in Canada: a population-based study.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine and University of Manitoba Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We aimed to define the rates of hospitalization and readmission for inflammatory bowel disease in Canada.

METHODS:

The data source was Statistics Canada Person Oriented Information Database (1994-2001). The number of stays for a diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) by ICD-9-CM code 555 or 556 was extracted (and assessed when CD or UC was the first diagnosis or was 1 of 16 diagnoses on the patient discharge abstract). Age-, gender-, and disease-specific rates of hospitalization, length of stay, readmission, and surgery were assessed.

RESULTS:

The age-adjusted hospitalization rate for CD declined over 1994-2001 from 29.2 to 26.9/100,000 but was stable for UC at 12.6-13.3 per 100,000. In the 7 yr, 39.4% of CD patients (21.3-24.0%/yr) and 33.7% of UC patients (18.5-20.3%/yr) got readmitted at least once. The average length of stay declined from 10.3 (1994-1995) to 9.1 days (2000-2001) (p = 0.029) in CD and in UC declined from 12.2 to 10.1 days (p = 0.054). Of all hospitalizations, major surgery occurred in 48% of CD (44.8-49.8% per yr) and 55% of UC (51.5-59.0% per yr).

CONCLUSIONS:

Rates of hospitalization declined slightly for CD over the 7 yr but still remained twice as great as the rates for UC. Approximately 20% of CD and UC subjects got readmitted per year and over 7 yr approximately 35% got readmitted. Major surgery was a more common reason for hospitalization in UC than in CD.

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