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Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006 Jun;290(6):H2247-56. Epub 2006 Jan 6.

Reactive oxygen species mediate modification of glycocalyx during ischemia-reperfusion injury.

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1
Cardiovascular Research Center, Dept. of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, 409 Lane Road, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA.

Abstract

The glycocalyx (Gcx) is a complex and poorly understood structure covering the luminal surface of endothelial cells. It is known to be a determinant of vascular rheology and permeability and may be a key control site for the vascular injuries caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). We used intravital-microscopy to evaluate the effects of I/R injury on two properties of Gcx in mouse cremasteric microvessels: exclusion of macromolecules (anionic-dextrans) and intracapillary distribution of red blood cells (RBC). In this model, the Gcx is rapidly modified by I/R injury with an increase in 70-kDa anionic-dextran penetration without measurable effect on the penetration of 580-kDa anionic-dextran or on RBC exclusion. The effects of I/R injury appear to be mediated by the rapid production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because they are ameliorated by the addition of exogenous superoxide dismutase-catalase. Intravenous application of allopurinol or heparin also inhibited the effects of I/R injury, and we interpret efficacy of allopurinol as evidence for a role for xanthine-oxidoreductase (XOR) in the response to I/R injury. Heparin, which is hypothesized to displace XOR from a heparin-binding domain in the Gcx, reduced the effects of I/R. The effects of I/R injury were also partially prevented or fully reversed by the intravascular infusion of exogenous hyaluronan. These data demonstrate: 1) the liability of Gcx during I/R injury; 2) the importance of locally produced ROS in the injury to Gcx; and 3) the potential importance of heparin-binding sites in modulating the ROS production. Our findings further highlight the relations between glycosaminoglycans and the pathophysiology of Gcx in vivo.

Comment in

PMID:
16399871
DOI:
10.1152/ajpheart.00796.2005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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