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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2006 Jan;131(1):73-80. Epub 2005 Dec 5.

Risk factors for primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation.

Author information

1
University of Minnesota, Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Minneapolis, Minn, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation has proposed a new grading system for primary graft dysfunction based on the ratio of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen measured within 48 hours after lung transplantation. Worsening primary graft dysfunction grade is associated with increased operative mortality rates and decreased long-term survival. This study evaluated donor and recipient risk factors for postoperative International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade 3 primary graft dysfunction.

METHODS:

We reviewed donor and recipient medical records of 402 consecutive lung transplantations performed between 1992 and 2004. We calculated a worst International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation primary graft dysfunction grade in the first 48 hours postoperatively. Severe primary graft dysfunction (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade 3) was defined by a ratio of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen of less than 200. Associations of potential risk factors with grade 3 primary graft dysfunction in the first 48 hours postoperatively were examined through bivariate and multivariate analysis.

RESULTS:

The 90-day mortality rate associated with the development of International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade 3 primary graft dysfunction in the first 48 hours postoperatively was 17% versus 9% in the group without grade 3 primary graft dysfunction. Significant bivariate risk factors associated with this end point were increasing donor age, donor smoking history of more than 10 pack-years, early transplantation era (1992-1998), increasing preoperative recipient pulmonary artery pressure, and recipient diagnosis. In the multivariate analysis only recipient pulmonary artery pressure, donor age, and transplantation era were associated with grade 3 primary graft dysfunction in the first 48 hours postoperatively at a P value of less than .05.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our analysis of donor and recipient risk factors for severe primary graft dysfunction identified patient groups at high risk for poor outcomes after lung transplantation that might benefit from treatments aimed at reducing reperfusion injury.

PMID:
16399297
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2005.08.039
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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