Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Kidney Int. 2006 Feb;69(4):671-8.

Hypertension, glomerular number, and birth weight in African Americans and white subjects in the southeastern United States.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi 39216-4505, USA. mhughson@pathology.umsmed.edu

Abstract

Low nephron number has been related to low birth weight and hypertension. In the southeastern United States, the estimated prevalence of chronic kidney disease due to hypertension is five times greater for African Americans than white subjects. This study investigates the relationships between total glomerular number (Nglom), blood pressure, and birth weight in southeastern African Americans and white subjects. Stereological estimates of Nglom were obtained using the physical disector/fractionator technique on autopsy kidneys from 62 African American and 60 white subjects 30-65 years of age. By medical history and recorded blood pressures, 41 African Americans, and 24 white subjects were identified as hypertensive and 21 African Americans and 36 white subjects as normotensive. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was obtained on 81 and birth weights on 63 subjects. For African Americans, relationships between MAP, Nglom, and birth weight were not significant. For white subjects, they were as follows: MAP and Nglom (r=-0.4551, P=0.0047); Nglom and birth weight (r=0.5730, P=0.0022); MAP and birth weight (r=-0.4228, P=0.0377). For African Americans, average Nglom of 961 840+/-292 750 for normotensive and 867 358+/-341 958 for hypertensive patients were not significantly different (P=0.285). For white subjects, average Nglom of 923 377+/-256 391 for normotensive and 754 319+/-329 506 for hypertensive patients were significantly different (P=0.03). The data indicate that low nephron number and possibly low birth weight may play a role in the development of hypertension in white subjects but not African Americans.

PMID:
16395270
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ki.5000041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center