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J Neuroimaging. 2005;15(4 Suppl):46S-57S.

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the monitoring of multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Interventional Imaging, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, TX 77030, USA. ponnada.a.narayana@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

In addition to providing information on tissue structure, magnetic resonance (MR) technology offers the potential to investigate tissue metabolism and function. MR spectroscopy (MRS) offers a wealth of data on the biochemistry of a selected brain tissue volume, which represent potential surrogate markers for the pathology underlying multiple sclerosis (MS). In particular, the N-acetylaspartate peak in an MR spectrum is a putative marker of neuronal and axonal integrity, and the choline peak appears to reflect cell-membrane metabolism. On this basis, a diminished N-acetylaspartate peak is interpreted to represent neuronal/axonal dysfunction or loss, and an elevated choline peak represents heightened cell-membrane turnover, as seen in demyelination, remyelination, inflammation, or gliosis. Therefore, MRS may provide a unique tool to evaluate the severity of MS, establish a prognosis, follow disease evolution, understand its pathogenesis, and evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, which complements the information obtained from the various forms of assessment made by conventional MR imaging.

PMID:
16385018
PMCID:
PMC1351238
DOI:
10.1177/1051228405284200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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