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Int J Cancer. 2006 Jun 1;118(11):2744-9.

The norepinephrine-driven metastasis development of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells in BALB/c nude mice is inhibited by beta-blockers.

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1
Institute of Immunology, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany.

Abstract

The development of metastases is a decisive step in the course of a cancer disease. The detection of metastases in cancer patients is correlated with a poor prognosis, and over 90% of all deaths from cancer are not due to the primary tumor, which often can be successfully treated, but are due to the metastases. Tumor cell migration, a prerequisite for metastasis development, is not merely genetically determined, but is distinctly regulated by signal substances of the environment including chemokines and neurotransmitters. We have shown previously that the migration of breast, prostate, and colon carcinoma cells is enhanced by the stress-related neurotransmitter norepinephrine in vitro, and that this effect can be inhibited by the beta-blocker propranolol. We now provide for the first time evidence for the in vivo relevance of this neurotransmitter-driven regulation using PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells. The development of lumbar lymph node metastases in athymic BALB/c nude mice increased with the application of norepinephrine via microosmotic pumps, while propranolol inhibited this effect. However, the growth of the primary tumor was not affected by either treatment. Additionally, experiments using human tissue microarrays showed that 70-90 percent of breast, colon, and prostate carcinoma tissues express the relevant beta2-adrenoceptor. Thus, our work contributes to the understanding of the basic cellular mechanisms of metastasis development, and furthermore delivers a rationale for the chemopreventive use of clinically established beta-blockers for the inhibition of metastases.

PMID:
16381019
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.21723
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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