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Am J Public Health. 2006 Feb;96(2):315-24. Epub 2005 Dec 27.

Relative effectiveness of worker safety and health training methods.

Author information

1
A. B. Freeman School of Business, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA. mburke1@tulane.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to determine the relative effectiveness of different methods of worker safety and health training aimed at improving safety knowledge and performance and reducing negative outcomes (accidents, illnesses, and injuries).

METHODS:

Ninety-five quasi-experimental studies (n=20991) were included in the analysis. Three types of intervention methods were distinguished on the basis of learners' participation in the training process: least engaging (lecture, pamphlets, videos), moderately engaging (programmed instruction, feedback interventions), and most engaging (training in behavioral modeling, hands-on training).

RESULTS:

As training methods became more engaging (i.e., requiring trainees' active participation), workers demonstrated greater knowledge acquisition, and reductions were seen in accidents, illnesses, and injuries. All methods of training produced meaningful behavioral performance improvements.

CONCLUSIONS:

Training involving behavioral modeling, a substantial amount of practice, and dialogue is generally more effective than other methods of safety and health training. The present findings challenge the current emphasis on more passive computer-based and distance training methods within the public health workforce.

PMID:
16380566
PMCID:
PMC1470479
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2004.059840
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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