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Mol Genet Metab. 2006 Mar;87(3):213-8.

Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV: N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase mutations in Tunisian patients.

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1
Mount Sinai School of Medicine of New York University, NY, USA.

Abstract

Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA; OMIM #253000) or Morquio A syndrome is an autosomal recessive inborn error resulting from the deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), and the progressive lysosomal accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Clinically, the severe form of this lysosomal storage disease is characterized by a characteristic severe bone dysplasia and normal intelligence. To date, a variety of mutations have been associated with the severe MPS IVA phenotype. Here, we report the GALNS mutations in six severe MPS IVA patients from four unrelated Tunisian families. For mutation detection, each of the 14 exons and adjacent intron-exon junctions of the GALNS gene were sequenced after PCR-amplification from genomic DNA. Two novel mutations were identified: a G to A transition in the conserved 5' donor splice site of intron 1 (GACgt-->GACat: designated IVS1(+1g-->a)) and a G to C transversion in codon 66 of exon 2 predicting a glycine to arginine substitution (G66R). The IVS1(+1g-->a) mutation was homozygous in five similarly affected patients from three presumably unrelated families, but haplotype analysis suggested a common ancestor. The affected patient in the fourth family was homozygous for the G66R mutation. These are the first GALNS mutations causing severe MPS IVA disease identified in Tunisia. These molecular findings provide genotype/phenotype correlations, and permit accurate carrier detection, prenatal diagnosis, and counseling for MPS IVA disease in Tunisia where first cousin consanguineous mating remains frequent.

PMID:
16378744
DOI:
10.1016/j.ymgme.2005.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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