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Nat Rev Neurosci. 2006 Jan;7(1):54-64.

Cognitive neuroscience of emotional memory.

Author information

1
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA. klabar@duke.edu

Abstract

Emotional events often attain a privileged status in memory. Cognitive neuroscientists have begun to elucidate the psychological and neural mechanisms underlying emotional retention advantages in the human brain. The amygdala is a brain structure that directly mediates aspects of emotional learning and facilitates memory operations in other regions, including the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Emotion-memory interactions occur at various stages of information processing, from the initial encoding and consolidation of memory traces to their long-term retrieval. Recent advances are revealing new insights into the reactivation of latent emotional associations and the recollection of personal episodes from the remote past.

PMID:
16371950
DOI:
10.1038/nrn1825
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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