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Contraception. 2006 Jan;73(1):53-5. Epub 2005 Nov 14.

Self-injection of monthly combined hormonal contraceptive.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Box 668, Rochester, NY 14642-8668, USA. nancy_stanwood@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The monthly injectable contraceptive is usually administered in the office. We aimed to compare home self-injection with office administration with respect to satisfaction, compliance, and time and money spent on contraceptive behavior.

METHODS:

We enrolled 16 subjects and taught them self-injection for a prospective cohort trial with crossover. Subjects performed three self-injections at home and then had three office injections by the nurse.

RESULTS:

Ten subjects completed the protocol. They reported similarly low pain and anxiety with nurse injections and self-injections. Women reported spending less money and similar time for home injections. Most subjects strongly preferred giving themselves injections at home to office injections and would recommend self-injection to other women.

CONCLUSIONS:

Self-injection of the monthly contraceptive at home is a preferable alternative to office administration for these subjects. This study demonstrates the feasibility of teaching women self-injection. Future studies should look at how best to teach women self-injection and to select women who will be successful with self-injection of contraceptives.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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