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Behav Res Ther. 2006 Sep;44(9):1331-5. Epub 2005 Dec 20.

Hypnotherapy and cognitive behaviour therapy of acute stress disorder: a 3-year follow-up.

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1
School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Sydney, Australia. r.bryant@unsw.edu.au

Abstract

The long-term benefits of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for trauma survivors with acute stress disorder were investigated by assessing patients 3 years after treatment. Civilian trauma survivors (n=87) were randomly allocated to six sessions of CBT, CBT combined with hypnosis, or supportive counselling (SC), 69 completed treatment, and 53 were assessed 2 years post-treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. In terms of treatment completers, 2 CBT patients (10%), 4 CBT/hypnosis patients (22%), and 10 SC patients (63%) met PTSD criteria at 2-years follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that 12 CBT patients (36%), 14 CBT/hypnosis patients (46%), and 16 SC patients (67%) met PTSD criteria at 2-year follow-up. Patients who received CBT and CBT/hypnosis reported less re-experiencing and less avoidance symptoms than patients who received SC. These findings point to the long-term benefits of early provision of CBT in the initial month after trauma.

PMID:
16368074
DOI:
10.1016/j.brat.2005.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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