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Urology. 2005 Dec;66(6):1292-5.

Sexual function after partial penectomy for penile cancer.

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  • 1Division of Urology, Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. fredromero@terra.com.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare sexual function and satisfaction before and after partial penectomy and to evaluate possible dysfunctions that could modify postoperative sexual functioning.

METHODS:

A total of 18 patients underwent a personal interview and answered the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire to determine erectile function, orgasmic function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sexual life. Domain scores were computed by summing the scores for individual answers, and the final scores were compared before and after partial penectomy.

RESULTS:

The median patient age was 52 years. The medium penile length after partial penectomy was 4 cm in the flaccid state; 55.6% of patients reported erectile function that allowed sexual intercourse. The main reason for not resuming sexual intercourse appeared to be related to feelings of shame owing to the small penis size and the absence of the glans penis found in 50% of sexually abstinent patients. Surgical complications also compromised the resumption of sexual activity after amputation in 33.3% of these patients. However, 66.7% sustained the same frequency and level of sexual desire as before surgery, and 72.2% continued to have ejaculation and orgasm every time they had sexual stimulation or intercourse. Only 33.3% maintained their preoperative sexual intercourse frequency and were satisfied with their sexual relationship with their partners and their overall sex life.

CONCLUSIONS:

The preoperative and postoperative scores were statistically different for all domains of sexual function after partial penectomy.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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