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J Nephrol. 2005 Nov-Dec;18(6):727-32.

Urotensin II in end-stage renal disease: an inverse correlate of sympathetic function and cardiac natriuretic peptides.

Author information

1
CNR-IBIM, Institute of Biomedicine, Clinical Epidemiology and Physiopathology of Renal Diseases and Hypertension & Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Reggio Calabria - Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Urotensin II (UTN) is a peptide highly conserved across species with disparate effects on the vascular system and it is currently unclear whether high plasma UTN levels play a vasculotoxic or a vasculoprotective role.

METHODS:

In this study, we investigated the relationship between plasma UTN and sympathetic activity and cardiac natriuretic hormones in 191 hemodialysis (HD) patients without clinical evidence of heart failure.

RESULTS:

Plasma UTN was significantly higher in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (median: 6.5 ng/mL) than in age matched healthy subjects (median: 3.1 ng/mL) (p<0.001). On univariate analysis, UTN was inversely related to heart rate (r=-0.24), dialysis treatment duration (r=-0.27), norepinephrine (r=-0.28), neuropeptide Y (NPY) (r=-0.66), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) (r=-0.41) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) (r=-0.28) (all p<0.008). Of note, in multiple regression analyses these associations maintained strength similar to that of the corresponding unadjusted correlation coefficients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The inverse links between UTN and neuro-hormonal factors indicate that UTN down-regulation in the presence of high sympathetic activity and high BNP could be a counter-regulatory response aimed at mitigating cardiovascular (CV) damage or that UTN itself acts as a protective factor.

PMID:
16358231
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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