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Teach Learn Med. 2006 Winter;18(1):62-8.

Structured practice opportunities with a mnemonic affect medical student interviewing skills for intimate partner violence.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. Elizabeth_Edwardsen@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low rates of partner violence inquiry and detection are reported in the medical setting.

PURPOSE:

To determine if a teaching module with a mnemonic improves interviewing skills.

METHOD:

Prospective randomized trial. A total of 43 medical students were assigned to either the intervention group (teaching module with guided discussion and practice highlighting use of a mnemonic) or the control group (general discussion and provision of the mnemonic at the end of the session). These students subsequently interviewed simulated patients.

RESULTS:

A total of 75% of the intervention group and 62% of the control group reported the mnemonic was helpful. A total of 68% of the intervention group and 45% of the control group asked a direct question about partner violence. Students who obtained a history of abuse consistently asked direct, nonjudgmental question(s).

CONCLUSIONS:

Students learn to perform desired interviewing skills more frequently when they have the benefit of guided discussion, practice, and memory aids.

PMID:
16354143
DOI:
10.1207/s15328015tlm1801_13
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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