Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 Dec;123(12):1671-5.

Minimally invasive orbital decompression: local anesthesia and hand-carved bone.

Author information

1
Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, The David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles 90095-7006, USA. guybensimon@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the safety and efficacy of a conservative orbital decompression using sharp-curette bony decompression and intraconal fat debulking through a transconjunctival incision in patients with thyroid-related orbitopathy and mild to moderate proptosis.

DESIGN:

Retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series.

PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS:

Data from all patients undergoing minimal orbital decompression at the Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, Calif, over a period of 4(1/4) years were collected and analyzed. Data included visual acuity, exophthalmometry measurements, intraocular pressure, complete slitlamp examination results, ocular ductions, new-onset primary or downgaze diplopia, and patient satisfaction. Conservative decompression was performed through a transconjunctival incision using a manual curette and by removing cortical bone from the zygomatic marrow space on the anterior rim of the inferior orbital fissure; intraconal fat was bluntly dissected and excised or suctioned with a Frasier tip aspirator.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Patient perception of pressure pain and ocular discomfort, proptosis, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, postoperative complications, and new-onset primary or downgaze diplopia.

RESULTS:

Eighty minimally invasive orbital decompression surgeries were performed in 48 patients (6 male, 42 female). Six surgeries (4 patients) were performed for prominent globes with relative proptosis and no thyroid-related orbitopathy (non-Graves proptosis). All patients had improvement in congestive orbitopathy and pressure pain associated with thyroid-related orbitopathy. Exophthalmos decreased by a mean +/- SD of 2.4 +/- 2.6 mm from 22.7 +/- 2.5 mm (range, 17-29 mm) to 20.3 +/- 2.3 mm (range, 14-25 mm) (P<.001 [95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.0]). Mean visual acuity improved after surgery (P = .02). One patient (2.1%) developed postoperative primary or downgaze diplopia; he underwent successful eye muscle surgery at a later stage. No complications were associated with orbital decompression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Minimally invasive orbital decompression surgery with intraconal fat debulking in this group of patients was effective in proptosis reduction; improvement in subjective pressure pain and high patient satisfaction were noticed. Surgery was associated with a low rate (2.1%) of new-onset primary or downgaze diplopia. Proptosis reduction using a graded approach accounting for 4 mm of retrodisplacement was achieved.

PMID:
16344438
DOI:
10.1001/archopht.123.12.1671
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center