Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Neurol. 2005 Dec;62(12):1904-8.

Brain morphometry, T2-weighted hyperintensities, and IQ in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27514-7025, USA. greenwor@neurology.unc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Larger gray matter (GM) volume in healthy children is correlated with higher IQ. Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have larger brains, their magnetic resonance images frequently show T2-weighted hyperintensities, and their IQs are lower.

OBJECTIVES:

To confirm the hypotheses that (1) children with NF1 have larger GM and white matter volumes, (2) the greatest volume differences are in the frontal and parietal regions and in children with NF1 with hyperintensities, and (3) GM volume is inversely related to IQ in children with NF1.

DESIGN:

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition IQ testing and measurement of cerebral volumes and hyperintensities in brain magnetic resonance images were performed on 36 children with NF1 and on 36 matched relatives who served as control subjects.

RESULTS:

Gray matter and white matter volumes were significantly larger in children with NF1. The greatest difference was observed in cerebral white matter volume, predominantly in the frontal lobes, whereas the greatest difference in GM volume was in the temporal, parietal, and occipital regions. In controls, IQ was significantly related to GM volume, but in children with NF1, IQ was not inversely associated with GM volume, although IQs of children with NF1 were significantly lower.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with NF1 do not have the normal relationship between GM volume and IQ. Larger GM volume in the posterior brain regions and larger white matter volumes in the frontal brain regions contribute to the larger brain volume in children with NF1.

PMID:
16344348
DOI:
10.1001/archneur.62.12.1904
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center