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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006 Jan 1;41(1):87-92.

Perinatal HIV counseling and rapid testing in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico: seroprevalence and correlates of HIV infection.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA 92093-0672, USA. rviani@ucsd.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the acceptance of counseling and rapid HIV testing and to determine the associated risk factors for HIV infection in pregnant women in Baja California, Mexico.

METHODS:

Pregnant women attending Tijuana General Hospital who consented to participate in the study had blood drawn for a rapid HIV test (Determine HIV-1/2; Abbott Diagnostics, North Chicago, IL). A confirmatory enzyme immunoassay and Western blot were performed and demographic and risk factor data were obtained.

RESULTS:

From March to November 2003, 1529 (92.5%) of 1653 women who sought prenatal care and 1068 (95.2%) of 1122 women in labor consented to participate. HIV seroprevalence was significantly higher among women screened during labor (12/1068, 1.12%) compared with those seeking prenatal care (5/1529, 0.33%). HIV-infected women were significantly more likely to use injection drugs (12% vs. 1%, P = 0.02), "other" drugs, including methamphetamine, marijuana, and cocaine (65% vs. 6%, P < 0.001), to have more sex partners (3.6 vs. 2.6, P = 0.0002), to not have received prenatal care (41% vs. 13%, P = 0.03), and to have a spouse/partner who used injection drugs (36% vs. 4%, P < 0.001) or "other" drugs (73% vs. 23%, P < 0.001). In multivariate regression analysis, use of methamphetamine (adjusted odds ratio, 17.8, 95% CI, 5.6-56) was independently associated with the risk of HIV infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings indicate a wide acceptance of HIV counseling and testing and document a higher HIV seroprevalence among pregnant women delivering at Tijuana General Hospital than current established estimates in Mexico.

PMID:
16340479
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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