Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Dec;82(6):1320-6.

Randomized controlled trial of homocysteine-lowering vitamin treatment in elderly patients with vascular disease.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom. d.j.stott@clinmed.gla.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Homocysteine is an independent risk factor for vascular disease and is associated with dementia in older people. Potential mechanisms include altered endothelial and hemostatic function.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to determine the effects of folic acid plus vitamin B-12, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 on homocysteine and cognitive function.

DESIGN:

This was a factorial 2 x 2 x 2, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with 3 active treatments: folic acid (2.5 mg) plus vitamin B-12 (500 microg), vitamin B-6 (25 mg), and riboflavin (25 mg). We studied 185 patients aged >or=65 y with ischemic vascular disease. Outcome measures included plasma homocysteine, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor at 3 mo and cognitive change (determined with the use of the Letter Digit Coding Test and on the basis of the Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status) after 1 y.

RESULTS:

The mean (+/-SD) baseline plasma homocysteine concentration was 16.5 +/- 6.4 micromol/L. This value was 5.0 (95% CI: 3.8, 6.2) micromol/L lower in patients given folic acid plus vitamin B-12 than in patients not given folic acid plus vitamin B-12 but did not change significantly with vitamin B-6 or riboflavin treatment. Homocysteine lowering with folic acid plus vitamin B-12 had no significant effect, relative to the 2 other treatments, on fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, or cognitive performance as measured by the Letter Digit Coding Test (mean change: -1; 95% CI: -2.3, 1.4) and the Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status (-0.7; 95% CI: -1.7, 0.4).

CONCLUSION:

Oral folic acid plus vitamin B-12 decreased homocysteine concentrations in elderly patients with vascular disease but was not associated with statistically significant beneficial effects on cognitive function over the short or medium term.

PMID:
16332666
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center