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Oncogene. 2006 Apr 13;25(16):2339-48.

Ionizing radiation enhances therapeutic activity of mda-7/IL-24: overcoming radiation- and mda-7/IL-24-resistance in prostate cancer cells overexpressing the antiapoptotic proteins bcl-xL or bcl-2.

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1
Department of Pathology, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Abstract

Subtraction hybridization applied to terminally differentiating human melanoma cells identified mda-7/IL-24, a cytokine belonging to the IL-10 gene superfamily. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of mda-7/IL-24 (Ad.mda-7) provokes apoptosis selectively in a wide spectrum of cancers in vitro in cell culture, in vivo in human tumor xenograft animal models and in patients with advanced carcinomas and melanomas. In human prostate cancer cells, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of reactive oxygen species in the apoptotic process has been established. Ectopic overexpression of bcl-xL and bcl-2 prevents these changes including apoptosis induction in prostate tumor cells by Ad.mda-7. We now document that this resistance to apoptosis can be reversed by treating bcl-2 family overexpressing prostate tumor cells with ionizing radiation in combination with Ad.mda-7 or purified GST-MDA-7 protein. Additionally, radiation augments apoptosis induction by mda-7/IL-24 in parental and neomycin-resistant prostate tumor cells. Radiosensitization to mda-7/IL-24 is dependent on JNK signaling, as treatment with the JNK 1/2/3 inhibitor SP600125 abolishes this effect. Considering that elevated expression of bcl-xL and bcl-2 are frequent events in prostate cancer development and progression, the present studies support the use of ionizing radiation in combination with mda-7/IL-24 as a means of augmenting the therapeutic benefit of this gene in prostate cancer, particularly in the context of tumors displaying resistance to radiation therapy owing to bcl-2 family member overexpression.

PMID:
16331261
DOI:
10.1038/sj.onc.1209271
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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