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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Dec;37(12):2032-7.

Effects of acute exercise on mood and well-being in patients with major depressive disorder.

Author information

1
The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, Exercise Psychology Laboratory, Austin, TX 78712, USA. john.bart@mail.utexas.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was designed to determine if a single bout of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise would improve mood and well-being in 40 (15 male, 25 female) individuals who were receiving treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD).

METHODS:

All participants were randomly assigned to exercise at 60-70% of age-predicted maximal heart rate for 30 min or to a 30-min period of quiet rest. Participants completed both the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale (SEES) as indicators of mood 5 min before, and 5, 30, and 60 min following their experimental condition.

RESULTS:

Both groups reported similar reductions in measures of psychological distress, depression, confusion, fatigue, tension, and anger. Only the exercise group, however, reported a significant increase in positive well-being and vigor scores.

CONCLUSION:

Although 30 min of either moderate-intensity treadmill exercise or quiet rest is sufficient to improve the mood and well-being of patients with MDD, exercise appears to have a greater effect on the positively valenced states measured.

PMID:
16331126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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