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J Hypertens. 2006 Jan;24(1):193-200.

The prospective, randomized investigation of the safety and efficacy of telmisartan versus ramipril using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (PRISMA I).

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1
Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester School of Medicine, Leicester, UK. bw17@le.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the efficacy and safety of once-daily telmisartan and ramipril on blood pressure (BP) reductions during the last 6 h of the dosing interval.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint study using ambulatory BP monitoring, 801 patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension were randomly assigned to once-daily treatment with telmisartan 80 mg for 14 weeks or ramipril 5 mg for 8 weeks and then force titrated to ramipril 10 mg for the last 6 weeks. Primary endpoints were the reduction from baseline in the last 6-h mean ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP). Secondary endpoints included changes in 24-h, morning, daytime and night-time mean ambulatory BP and ambulatory BP response rates.

RESULTS:

Telmisartan 80 mg produced greater reductions in the last 6-h mean ambulatory SBP and DBP compared with ramipril 5 mg (P < 0.0001) and 10 mg (P < 0.0001), and was superior to ramipril for all secondary ambulatory SBP and DBP endpoints (P < 0.05). Ambulatory BP response rates (24-h mean ambulatory SBP/DBP < 130/80 mmHg or reduction from baseline > or = 10 mmHg) were greater with telmisartan 80 mg (P < 0.01) than with ramipril 5 and 10 mg. Ramipril was associated with a higher incidence of treatment-related cough (5.7 versus 0.5% for telmisartan).

CONCLUSIONS:

Telmisartan was significantly more effective than ramipril in reducing BP throughout the 24-h dosing interval and particularly during the last 6 h, a time when patients appear to be at greatest risk of cerebro- and cardiovascular events. Both drugs were well tolerated, although ramipril was associated with a higher incidence of cough.

PMID:
16331118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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