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Prim Care. 2005 Dec;32(4):865-81.

Community interventions for cardiovascular disease.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health, Brown Medical School, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Donna_Parker@brown.edu

Erratum in

  • Prim Care. 2006 Jun;33(2):xix.

Abstract

Review of the community-based CVD intervention programs suggests that a number of components have been successful using varying methods and materials for CVD risk reduction. It should be noted, however, that in multi-intervention programs it is often difficult to determine which components of the intervention were responsible for the overall success of the study. The community-based approach to CVD prevention is generalizable, cost-effective (because of the use of mass communication methods), and has the potential for modifying the environment and influencing health policies. Based on the experiences and successes of a number of community projects, recommendations have been proposed for developing future programs. Although they are not totally comprehensive, it has been suggested that a community-based intervention program should consider the following recommendations: 1) An understanding of the community: the needs and priorities of the community should be assessed, and close collaboration with individuals from the community, including community leaders, opinion leaders, community health care providers, and community organizations from various sectors of the community, should be consulted. Efforts should be focused on underserved and vulnerable populations. 2) Inclusion of community activities: these activities should be integrated within the context of the community environment, including primary health care services, voluntary organizations, grocery stores, restaurants, work sites, schools, and local media. 3) Inclusion mass media messages: the mass media can provide information and reinforcement of the behavior change. 4) Develop cost-effective interventions to assure that the community is exposed to an effective dose of the intervention. 5) Work with community organizations to help change social and physical environments to make them more conducive to health and healthy life-styles changes. 6) Develop a reliable monitoring and evaluation system: monitor the change process and conduct summary evaluations. 7) Disseminate the results to ensure that the benefits from the community program reach all communities. 8) For national implementation, the intervention program should work closely with national policy makers throughout the project.

PMID:
16326217
DOI:
10.1016/j.pop.2005.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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