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Metabolism. 2006 Jan;55(1):103-7.

Plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of purine bases (uric acid, hypoxanthine, and xanthine) and oxypurinol after rigorous exercise.

Author information

1
First Department of Physiology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501, Japan.

Abstract

To investigate the effects of exercise on the plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of purine bases and oxypurinol, we performed 3 experiments with 6 healthy male subjects. The first was a combination of allopurinol intake (300 mg) and exercise (VO2max, 70%) (combination experiment), the second was exercise alone (exercise-alone experiment), and the third was allopurinol intake alone (allopurinol-alone experiment). In the combination experiment, exercise increased the concentrations of purine bases and noradrenaline in plasma, as well as lactic acid in blood and the urinary excretion of oxypurines, whereas it decreased the urinary excretion of uric acid and oxypurinol as well as the fractional excretion of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid, and oxypurinol. In the exercise-alone experiment, exercise increased the concentrations of purine bases and noradrenaline in plasma, lactic acid in blood, and the urinary excretion of oxypurines, whereas it decreased the urinary excretion of uric acid and fractional excretion of purine bases. In contrast, in the allopurinol-alone experiment, the plasma concentration, urinary excretion, and fractional excretion of purine bases and oxypurinol remained unchanged. These results suggest that increases in adenine nucleotide degradation and lactic acid production, as well as a release of noradrenaline caused by exercise, contribute to increases in plasma concentration and urinary excretion of oxypurines and plasma concentration of urate, as well as decreases in urinary excretion of uric acid and oxypurinol, along with fractional excretion of uric acid, oxypurinol, and xanthine. In addition, they suggest that oxypurinol does not significantly inhibit the exercise-induced increase in plasma concentration of urate.

PMID:
16324927
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2005.07.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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