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J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov;40(11):1024-8.

Development of reflux esophagitis following Helicobacter pylori eradication.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima Mitsubishi Hospital, 4-6-20 Kannonshin-machi, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima 733-0036, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We aimed to determine the incidence and causative factors of reflux esophagitis following Helicobacter pylori eradication in Japanese patients.

METHODS:

In patients in whom reflux esophagitis could not be detected endoscopically, we conducted an annual follow-up observation in 326 H. pylori-cured patients, 199 H. pylori-positive patients, and 151 H. pylori-negative patients, to study the incidence and causative factors of reflux esophagitis.

RESULTS:

Development of reflux esophagitis was observed in 74 (22.7%) of the H. pylori-cured patients during a median follow-up period of 6.0 years, in 16 (8.0%) of the H. pylori-positive patients during a median follow-up period of 5.0 years, and in 29 (19.2%) of the H. pylori-negative patients during a median follow-up period of 5.4 years. The results, after correction for sex and age, showed that H. pylori-cured patients had a significantly higher risk of reflux esophagitis than H. pylori-positive patients (risk ratio, 2.43; P < 0.01), but their risk did not differ from that in the H. pylori-negative patients. It was also shown that hiatal hernia (risk ratio, 4.01; P < 0.01) and smoking history (risk ratio, 1.77; P < 0.05) were significant risk factors for the development of reflux esophagitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

With regard to the development of reflux esophagitis following H. pylori eradiation therapy, we observed that the frequency was higher in H. pylori-cured patients than in H. pylori-positive patients, but the frequency in H. pylori-cured patients and H. pylori-negative patients was the same. We elucidated that hiatal hernia and smoking history are important risk factors for reflux esophagitis.

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PMID:
16322945
DOI:
10.1007/s00535-005-1685-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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