Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Stroke. 2006 Jan;37(1):172-8. Epub 2005 Dec 1.

A randomized controlled trial of functional neuromuscular stimulation in chronic stroke subjects.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. jjd17@case.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Conventional therapies fail to restore normal gait to many patients after stroke. The study purpose was to test response to coordination exercise, overground gait training, and weight-supported treadmill training, both with and without functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) using intramuscular (IM) electrodes (FNS-IM).

METHODS:

In a randomized controlled trial, 32 subjects (>1 year after stroke) were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: FNS-IM or No-FNS. Inclusion criteria included ability to walk independently but inability to execute a normal swing or stance phase. All subjects were treated 4 times per week for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure, obtained by a blinded evaluator, was gait component execution, according to the Tinetti gait scale. Secondary measures were coordination, balance, and 6-minute walking distance.

RESULTS:

Before treatment, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups for age, time since stroke, stroke severity, and each study measure. FNS-IM produced a statistically significant greater gain versus No-FNS for gait component execution (P=0.003; parameter estimate 2.9; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.6) and knee flexion coordination (P=0.049).

CONCLUSIONS:

FNS-IM can have a significant advantage versus No-FNS in improving gait components and knee flexion coordination after stroke.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center