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J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Dec;105(12):1927-32.

Nonhydrogenated cottonseed oil can be used as a deep fat frying medium to reduce trans-fatty acid content in french fries.

Author information

1
Department of Human Sciences, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX 75962, USA. ddaniel@sfasu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the fatty acid profile, in particular trans-fatty acids, of french fries fried in nonhydrogenated cottonseed oil as compared with french fries fried in partially hydrogenated canola oil and french fries fried in partially hydrogenated soybean oil.

DESIGN:

Cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated canola oil, and partially hydrogenated soybean oil were subjected to a temperature of 177 degrees C for 8 hours per day, and six batches of french fries were fried per day for 5 consecutive days. French fries were weighed before frying, cooked for 5 minutes, allowed to drain, and reweighed. Oil was not replenished and was filtered once per day. Both the oil and the french fries were evaluated to determine fatty acid profiles, trans-fatty acids, and crude fat.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

A randomized block design with split plot was used to analyze the data collected. Least-squares difference was used as the means separation test.

RESULTS:

No significant differences were found between fries prepared in the three oil types for crude fat. Fatty acid profiles for the french fries remained stable. The french fries prepared in cottonseed oil were significantly lower in trans-fatty acids. The combined total of the trans-fatty acid content and saturated fatty acid content were lower in french fries prepared in cottonseed oil.

CONCLUSIONS:

Because deep fat frying remains a popular cooking technique, health professionals should educate the public and the food service industry on the benefits of using nonhydrogenated cottonseed oil as an alternative to the commonly used hydrogenated oils.

PMID:
16321599
DOI:
10.1016/j.jada.2005.09.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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