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Neuropsychopharmacology. 2006 Jul;31(7):1537-44. Epub 2005 Nov 23.

Bupropion reduces methamphetamine-induced subjective effects and cue-induced craving.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at The University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. tnewton@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

Bupropion is an antidepressant with stimulant properties, which inhibits the reuptake of dopamine (DA) and norepinepherine, and is purported to enhance DA neurotransmission. Bupropion is considered an appealing candidate medication for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. The current laboratory study was set forth to assess the impact of bupropion treatment on the subjective effects produced by methamphetamine in the laboratory. We also assessed the effects of bupropion treatment on craving elicited by exposure to videotaped methamphetamine cues. A total of 26 participants were enrolled and 20 completed the entire study (n=10 placebo and n=10 bupropion, parallel groups design). Bupropion treatment was associated with reduced ratings of 'any drug effect' (p<0.02), and 'high' (p<0.02) following methamphetamine administration. There was also a significant bupropion-by-cue exposure interaction on General Craving Scale total score (p<0.002), and on the Behavioral Intention subscale (p<0.001). Overall, the data reveal that bupropion reduced acute methamphetamine-induced subjective effects and reduced cue-induced craving. Importantly, these data provide a rationale for the evaluation of bupropion in the treatment of methamphetamine dependence.

PMID:
16319910
DOI:
10.1038/sj.npp.1300979
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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