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Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(8):691-7.

Association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and clinical presentation and prognosis of sarcoidosis.

Author information

1
Hormone and Genetic Unit, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain. palia@csub.scs.es

Abstract

Serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) concentration is considered a marker of sarcoidosis activity. This concentration is influenced by an insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene, such that SACE levels follow the pattern DD>ID>II. The aim of our work was to study the relationship between I/D polymorphism and susceptibility to sarcoidosis, as well as the relation between this polymorphism and the clinical presentation and evolution of the disease in 177 sarcoidosis patients. A group of 104 individuals without sarcoidosis was included as control. Genotyping was done by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, and SACE concentration at diagnosis was determined by a kinetic method. No differences were observed in genotype or allele distributions between patients and controls, nor between patients considering the type of presentation (Löfgren versus non-Löfgren) and evolution of the disease (acute versus chronic). As reported for healthy populations, SACE concentrations followed the pattern DD>ID>II in sarcoidosis patients, but significant differences between genotypes existed only in the Löfgren group (p = 0.003) and in acute patients (p = 0.02). SACE concentrations at diagnosis were lower in acute patients (p = 0.05) and in Löfgren's syndrome (p = 0.04), but this seemed to occur only in ID individuals (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). No relation was thus found between I/D polymorphism and susceptibility to sarcoidosis, but ACE I/D genotyping may improve the assessment of disease activity, both at diagnosis and during the follow-up of treated and untreated patients.

PMID:
16319043
DOI:
10.1080/00365510500354128
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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