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Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jan 15;163(2):127-34. Epub 2005 Nov 23.

Iron deficiency and Helicobacter pylori infection in the United States.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, University of Texas School of Public Health, El Paso, USA. victor.cardenas@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

Using data from the current National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2000), the authors assessed whether Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in the United States. Iron deficiency was defined as at least two abnormal results out of three biomarkers of iron stores. IDA was defined as a low hemoglobin level in the presence of iron deficiency. H. pylori infection was measured by serology. Complex survey estimators were used in the analysis. For 7,462 survey participants aged >or=3 years, H. pylori infection was associated with decreased serum ferritin levels (percent change = -13.9%, 95% confidence interval (CI): -19.5, -8.0) but not with levels of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, transferrin saturation, or hemoglobin (percent change = 1.5%, -2.8%, and -1.1%, respectively). Multinomial logistic regression analyses indicated that H. pylori infection was associated with the prevalence of IDA (prevalence odds ratio (POR) = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.5, 4.6) and, to a lesser degree, other types of anemia (POR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.7). H. pylori infection was associated with a 40% increase in the prevalence of iron deficiency (POR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.9, 2.0) after controlling for relevant covariates. In the United States, H. pylori infection was associated with iron deficiency/IDA regardless of the presence or absence of peptic ulcer disease.

PMID:
16306309
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kwj018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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