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Am J Public Health. 2005 Dec;95(12):2206-12.

Mortality among very low-birthweight infants in hospitals serving minority populations.

Author information

1
University of California Los Angeles, USA. morales@rand.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated whether the proportion of Black very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants treated by hospitals is associated with neonatal mortality for Black and White VLBW infants.

METHODS:

We analyzed medical records linked to secondary data sources for 74050 Black and White VLBW infants (501 g to 1500 g) treated by 332 hospitals participating in the Vermont Oxford Network from 1995 to 2000. Hospitals where more than 35% of VLBW infants treated were Black were defined as "minority-serving."

RESULTS:

Compared with hospitals where less than 15% of the VLBW infants were Black, minority-serving hospitals had significantly higher risk-adjusted neonatal mortality rates (White infants: odds ratio [OR]=1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09, 1.56; Black infants: OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.64; Pooled: OR = 1.28, 95% CI=1.10, 1.50). Higher neonatal mortality in minority-serving hospitals was not explained by either hospital or treatment variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

Minority-serving hospitals may provide lower quality of care to VLBW infants compared with other hospitals. Because VLBW Black infants are disproportionately treated by minority-serving hospitals, higher neonatal mortality rates at these hospitals may contribute to racial disparities in infant mortality in the United States.

PMID:
16304133
PMCID:
PMC1449508
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2004.046730
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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