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Acta Paediatr. 2005 Oct;94(10):1395-1401.

Persistent effects of a pedagogical device targeted at prevention of severe hypoglycaemia: a randomized, controlled study.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Diabetes Research Centre and Division of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Sweden. sam.nordfeldt@lio.se

Abstract

AIM:

To study the long-term use of self-study material in type 1 diabetes patient education targeted at the prevention of severe hypoglycaemia.

METHODS:

Randomized 1:1:1 control study in three local hospitals. We studied 332 type 1 diabetes patients from the geographic population, aged 2.6-18.9 y at entry. The intervention group received a videotape and brochure in which interviewed patients, parents and medical experts reviewed in detail practical skills for self-control and treatment, with the aim of preventing severe hypoglycaemia. There were two control groups: one received a videotape and brochure with general diabetes information and the other only traditional treatment. Primary endpoints were severe hypoglycaemia needing assistance by another person and HbA1c. Dissemination, reading/viewing level, patients' attitudes and extra contact with caregivers were also investigated. At 24 mo, 249 subjects provided data.

RESULTS:

The yearly incidence of severe hypoglycaemia decreased at 24 mo from 42% to 25% (difference 17%, 95% CI 3-31, p = 0.0241) in the intervention group, but not in controls. HbA1c remained unchanged. Video use during months 13-24 was higher in the intervention group than in controls (p = 0.0477), ranging from 1-15 (median 2) times, among 37% of patients (months 1-12, 100%). Higher future use was anticipated for intervention material (p = 0.0003). Extra caregiver contact was related to severe hypoglycaemia (p = 0.0009). The cost of the material was <EUR 10 per patient.

CONCLUSION:

Mass-distributed pedagogical devices such as high-quality video programmes and brochures may reach high dissemination levels and, when targeted, contribute to the prevention of severe hypoglycaemia over a longer period of time, being a cost-effective complement to traditional care.

PMID:
16299869
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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