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J Perinatol. 2006 Feb;26(2):106-10.

A video study of pain relief during newborn male circumcision.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA. david.garry@nbhn.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effectiveness of dorsal penile nerve block and topical lidocaine-prilocaine anesthesia techniques for pain relief during circumcision.

METHODS:

In total, 18 healthy term newborn males were divided based on anesthesia. The topical lidocaine-prilocaine group had six males undergoing circumcision and three males undergoing a sham procedure. The dorsal penile nerve block group had six males undergoing circumcision and three males undergoing a sham procedure. The procedures were videotaped and viewed by 90 noninvestigator reviewers who scored the infants' pain using the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and a numeric pain scale. Statistical analysis utilized a P-value of <0.05 as significant.

RESULTS:

The median Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and numeric pain scores were significantly lower in the dorsal penile nerve block group than in the topical lidocaine-prilocaine group or the sham group (Neonatal Infant Pain Scale: 1.0 (range 0-6) versus 6.0 (range 2-6) versus 4.0 (range 0-6), P < 0.001, respectively; numeric pain scale: 2.0 (range 0-10) versus 8.0 (range 1-10) versus 4.0 (range 0-10), P < 0.001, respectively). In the sham group, procedures with the dorsal penile nerve block had significantly lower pain scores than those with topical lidocaine-prilocaine (Neonatal Infant Pain Scale: 1.0 (range 0-6) versus 5.0 (range 2- 6), P < 0.001; numeric pain scale: 1.0 (0-8) versus 6.0 (range 0-10), P < 0.001). When reviewers were divided by medical background, gender or parental status, no differences in pain scores were observed.

CONCLUSION:

The dorsal penile nerve block anesthesia technique for newborn male circumcision was significantly more effective for pain relief than topical lidocaine-prilocaine.

PMID:
16292334
DOI:
10.1038/sj.jp.7211413
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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