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Brain Res Brain Res Rev. 2005 Dec 15;50(2):336-60. Epub 2005 Nov 8.

Dopamine-glutamate reciprocal modulation of release and motor responses in the rat caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens of "intact" animals.

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  • 1Unité de Psychologie Médicale, CHU Sart-Tilman, B 4000 Liège, Belgium. hndfr@yahoo.fr

Abstract

Functional interactions between dopaminergic neurotransmission and glutamatergic neurotransmission are well known to play a crucial integrative role in the striatum, the major input structure of the basal ganglia now widely recognized to contribute to the control of motor activity and movements but also to the processing of cognitive and limbic functions. However, the nature of these interactions is still a matter of debate and controversy. This review (1) summarizes anatomical data on the distribution of dopaminergic and glutamatergic receptors in the striatum-accumbens complex, (2) focuses on the dopamine-glutamate interactions in the modulation of each other's release in the striatum-accumbens complex, and (3) examines the dopamine-glutamate interactions in the entire striatum involved in the control of locomotor activity. The effects of dopaminergic and glutamatergic receptor selective agonists and antagonists on dopamine and glutamate release as well on motor responses are analyzed in the entire striatum, by reviewing both in vitro and in vivo data. Regarding in vivo data, only findings from focal injections studies in the nucleus accumbens or the caudate-putamen of "intact" animals are reviewed. Altogether, the available data demonstrate that dopamine and glutamate do not uniformly interact to modulate each others' release and postsynaptic modulation of striatal output neurons. Depending on the receptor subtypes involved, interactions between dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission vary as a multiple and complex combination of tonic, phasic, facilitatory, and inhibitory properties.

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