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Tumori. 2005 Jul-Aug;91(4):346-50.

P53 alteration in oral tongue cancer is not significantly associated with age at diagnosis or tobacco exposure.

Author information

1
Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania, USA. nsd@seagal.us

Abstract

AIMS AND BACKGROUND:

The tumor suppressor gene P53 is mutated in almost half of head and neck cancers. The current work assessed the prognostic significance of P53 alteration in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue treated with a curative intent, its association with age at diagnosis (using 45 years as a cut point), and risk exposure as defined by tobacco and/or alcohol consumption.

METHODS:

P53 alteration was determined immunohistochemically in 45 patients with tongue cancer treated with a curative intent.

RESULTS:

P53 alteration occurred in 20 of 45 tumors (44%) and was more common among younger patients (58% versus 36% for younger versus older patients, respectively) and those lacking tobacco/alcohol exposure (53% versus 40% for "no-risk" and "risk" groups, respectively), but the differences were not statistically significant. With a median follow-up of 56 months, 5-year progression-free survival rates were 48% and 66% in patients with and without P53 detection, respectively (P = 0.22).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite a trend of a younger age at diagnosis in P53-altered tumors, results did not reach statistically significant differences. A trend of a worse clinical outcome with P53 alteration was noted.

PMID:
16277102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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