Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Inform Prim Care. 2003;11(1):5-11.

A survey of computer use in Scottish primary care: general practitioners are no longer technophobic but other primary care staff need better computer access.

Author information

1
Scottish Clinical Information Management in Primary Care (SCIMP), Royal College of General Practitioners (Scotland), Edinburgh, UK. scimp@rcgp-scotland.org.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the use of computing systems by primary care staff in Scotland. Participants Practice managers in Scotland on behalf of their practice teams.

METHODS:

A survey of computer use in Scottish general practices was carried out by the Scottish Clinical Information Management in Primary Care (SCIMP) group in April 2001. Every practice was sent an electronic copy of a questionnaire using NHSnet. Practices that did not respond to the electronic version were sent a paper version of the questionnaire.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Access to computers, use during consultations, links to laboratories, problems experienced by users.

RESULTS:

A total of 308 practices (30%) replied to the electronic questionnaire and 346 practices (33%) to a paper version, giving an overall response rate of 63% (654 practices). A total of 296 (29%) of practices could not receive the electronic version. It was reported that 94% of general practitioners and 74% of practice nurses frequently used a computer; 72% of practices used their computer for chronic disease management. There was great variability in links to laboratories for lab results (range 1-30% by region). Of responding practices, 16% had plans for a unified patient record, but access to a computer is still a major problem for community nurses. Satisfaction was expressed for all systems and many practices also use third-party programs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most Scottish doctors make frequent use of computers for a variety of clinical and practice management activities. Many other staff want to make greater use of computers, but are often unable to obtain access.

PMID:
16274587
DOI:
10.14236/jhi.v11i1.550
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BCS Learning and Development
Loading ...
Support Center