Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2005 Dec;15(6):667-74. Epub 2005 Nov 3.

Time and tide in cerebellar memory formation.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. c.dezeeuw@erasmusmc.nl

Abstract

The notion that the olivocerebellar system is crucial for motor learning is well established. In recent years, it has become evident that there can be many forms of both synaptic and non-synaptic plasticity within this system and that each might have a different role in developing and maintaining motor learning across a wide range of tasks. There are several possible molecular and cellular mechanisms that could underlie adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and eyeblink conditioning. Although causal relationships between particular cellular processes and individual components of a learned behaviour have not been demonstrated unequivocally, an overall picture is emerging that the different types and sites of cellular plasticity relate importantly to the stage of learning and/or its temporal specifics.

PMID:
16271462
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2005.10.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center