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Mechanisms of disease: the role of intestinal barrier function in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal autoimmune diseases.

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1
Mucosal Biology Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. afasano@mbrc.umaryland.edu

Abstract

The primary functions of the gastrointestinal tract have traditionally been perceived to be limited to the digestion and absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, and to water homeostasis. A more attentive analysis of the anatomic and functional arrangement of the gastrointestinal tract, however, suggests that another extremely important function of this organ is its ability to regulate the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to nonself-antigens. When the finely tuned trafficking of macromolecules is dysregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of autoimmunity, which are based on molecular mimicry and/or the bystander effect, and suggests that the autoimmune process can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing intestinal barrier function. Understanding the role of the intestinal barrier in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease is an area of translational research that encompasses many fields and is currently receiving a great deal of attention. This review is timely given the increased interest in the role of a 'leaky gut' in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases and the advent of novel treatment strategies, such as the use of probiotics.

PMID:
16265432
DOI:
10.1038/ncpgasthep0259
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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