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Hypertens Pregnancy. 2005;24(3):259-71.

Severe preeclampsia is associated with a positive family history of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate an association between a family history of cardiovascular disease and severe preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelets).

METHODS:

One hundred twenty-eight women with a history of severe preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome and 123 women with previous uncomplicated pregnancies only were included in the study. All participants completed questionnaires about diagnoses of cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia among their first-degree relatives, which were subsequently confirmed by the relatives' general practitioners. The main outcome measures were the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia among first-degree relatives of both groups. Statistical analysis was done using chi(2)-analysis.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of familial cardiovascular disease among women with a history of severe preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome (23%) compared to controls (19%) was not significantly different (OR 1.3, 95%CI 0.7-2.5). However, women with a history of severe preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome more often had one or more first-degree relatives with hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia before the age of 60 years compared to controls (54% vs. 32%, respectively; OR 2.6, 95%CI 1.5-4.3). The prevalence of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia among first-degree relatives, irrespective of age, also was significantly higher among women with a history of severe preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome as compared to controls (60% vs. 42%, respectively; OR 2.0, 95%CI 1.2-3.4).

CONCLUSION:

Severe preeclampsia is associated with a positive family history of hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia.

PMID:
16263598
DOI:
10.1080/10641950500281076
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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