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Prev Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;41(5-6):873-6. Epub 2005 Oct 27.

Correlates of condom failure among adolescent males: an exploratory study.

Author information

1
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, GA 30322, USA. crosby@uky.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify the prevalence and correlates of condom failure (defined as breakage or slipping off in the past 90 days) among a sample of adolescent males (15 to 21 years of age).

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study of 481 condom-using males residing in three US cities (Atlanta, GA, Providence RI, Miami FL). Data were collected, in the years 2000 and 2001, using audio computer-assisted self-interviewing technology. Prevalence ratios were used to determine the strength and significance of bivariate associations between ten assessed correlates and condom failure. Correlates achieving a screening level of significance were entered into a multivariate model that was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR).

RESULTS:

Recent condom failure was reported by 34.1%. Younger adolescents were about one-third less likely to report condom failure (AOR = 0.66; P = 0.4). Adolescents reporting multiple sex partners were about 80% more likely to report failure (AOR = 1.84; P = 0.09). Adolescents indicating they had sex with someone on the same day they met the person were about 80% more likely to report failure (AOR = 1.77; P = 0.02). Finally, adolescents indicating recent problems obtaining condoms were about 70% more likely to report failure (AOR = 1.69; P = 0.1). Failure was not less common among those reporting a history of STD infection or those ever impregnating a partner.

CONCLUSION:

Because adolescent males may commonly experience condom failure, targeted clinic- and community-based programs designed to reduce user error could be an important aspect of preventing pregnancy and the spread of STDs.

PMID:
16257047
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2005.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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