Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Med J Aust. 1992 May 4;156(9):614-7.

Mild bleeding disorders. A clinical and laboratory study.

Author information

1
Haematology Department, Repatriation General Hospital, Heidelberg West, VIC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate in-vitro haemostasis in subjects with symptoms suggesting a mild bleeding disorder.

DESIGN:

A prospective study in which an extensive range of in-vitro tests were applied unselectively.

SETTING:

Patients were referred from community-based practices and hospital outpatient services.

PATIENTS:

Ninety-three consecutive patients were examined. Hospital patients with severe illness were excluded.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

Patients presented with easy bruising (68%), epistaxis (12%), excessive operative bleeding (7%), menorrhagia (4%), haematuria (3%), dental bleeding (1%) and bleeding from other sites (5%). In no instance was the bleeding life threatening.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Results of laboratory tests for patients presenting with the symptoms of a mild bleeding disorder were compared with the results for a healthy reference group.

RESULTS:

Abnormal results of in-vitro tests were found in 53% of the subjects. Thirteen per cent had a prolonged bleeding time, of whom the majority had abnormal results of other in-vitro tests. Von Willebrand's disease was diagnosed in 7% of patients, although only half of these had a prolonged bleeding time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Abnormal results of in-vitro tests were prevalent among subjects with symptoms of mild bleeding disorder. Easy bruising was as powerful a clue as any other bleeding manifestation to the presence of an abnormal in-vitro test result.

PMID:
1625614
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center