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J Crit Care. 2005 Sep;20(3):281-7.

Potassium sorbate reduces gastric colonization in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

Author information

1
The Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Loyola University, Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

Erratum in

  • J Crit Care. 2006 Jun;21(2):230. Tulamait, Aiman [corrected to Tulaimat, Aiman].

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Tube feeding might increase gastric burden of pathogenic bacteria and predispose patients to ventilator-associated pneumonia. We sought to determine whether a tube feeding formula acidified using potassium sorbate could reduce gastric burden of potentially pathogenic bacteria.

DESIGN:

Prospective, randomized, double-blind trial.

SETTING:

RML Specialty Hospital, a facility with expertise in weaning patients from prolonged mechanical ventilation.

PATIENTS:

Thirty patients recovering from prolonged mechanical ventilation.

INTERVENTION:

Patients were randomized to receive either a standard tube feeding formula (n=14) or a formula acidified using potassium sorbate to a pH of 4.25 (n=16).

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Weekly quantitative cultures of gastric aspirates. The number of colony-forming units (CFUs) per patient was higher in the control than in the treatment group (53%+/-11% vs 9%+/-3.4%, threshold of >or=100,000 CFU/mL fluid, P=.003). The number of organisms isolated in each patient per week was higher among patients receiving standard tube feeding formula than among patients receiving acidified formula (0.91 +/- 0.20 vs 0.13 +/- 0.05 organisms per patient per week, threshold of >or=100,000 CFU/mL fluid, P=.0014). There was no difference in the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding or ventilator-associated pneumonia between study groups.

CONCLUSION:

Tube feeding formula acidified using potassium sorbate was well tolerated and reduced gastric bacterial burden in patients recovering from prolonged mechanical ventilation.

PMID:
16253799
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2005.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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