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Cancer Lett. 2005 Dec 8;230(1):134-40.

Water-soluble polymeric polyphenols from cinnamon inhibit proliferation and alter cell cycle distribution patterns of hematologic tumor cell lines.

Author information

1
Nutrient Requirements and Functions Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, ARS, USDA, Bldg 307C, Rm 227, BARC-East, Beltsville, MD 20705-2350, USA. schoenen@ba.ars.usda.gov

Abstract

To explore possible anti-cancer properties of water-soluble, polymeric polyphenols from cinnamon, three myeloid cell lines (Jurkat, Wurzburg, and U937) were exposed to increasing concentrations of an aqueous extract prepared from cinnamon (CE) for 24 h. Cell growth and cell cycle distribution patterns responded in a dose-dependent manner to CE. That is, an increase in the percentage of cells distributed in G2/M was observed in all three cell lines as the amount of CE increased. At the highest dose of CE, the percentage of Wurzburg cells in G2/M was 1.5- and 2.0-fold higher than those observed for Jurkat and U937 cells, respectively. Wurzburg cells lack the CD45 phosphatase and may be more sensitive to imbalances in signaling through kinase/phosphatase networks that promote growth. The results suggest the potential of CE to interact with phosphorylation/dephosphorylation signaling activities to reduce cellular proliferation in tandem with a block at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle.

PMID:
16253769
DOI:
10.1016/j.canlet.2004.12.039
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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