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Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;25(1):82-90. Epub 2005 Oct 25.

Effects of total enteral nutrition supplemented with a multi-fibre mix on faecal short-chain fatty acids and microbiota.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Nice, France. stephane.schneider@unice.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Impaired bowel function is frequent in tube-fed patients, and diarrhoea is associated with decreased faecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) concentrations. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a multi-fibre-enriched formula (15 g/l) and a fibre-free isoenergetic and isonitrogenous formula on faecal SCFAs and microbiota in long-term enteral nutrition (EN) patients.

METHODS:

Fifteen patients [11M/4F, aged 53 (40-73)] on total EN for 43 (1-310) months for dysphagia received a fibre-free formula for 7 days, followed in a random order by either the multi-fibre-enriched formula for 14 days and then the fibre-free formula for 14 days or vice versa. Stool samples were taken at the end of each period for measurement of SCFAs levels and different groups of bacteria. Results were compared with non-parametric tests.

RESULTS:

After the multi fibre EN, there was a significant median increase in total faecal SCFAs (+84%), butyrate (+20%) and acetate (+147%) compared with baseline. A significant increase in the total number of bacteria as determined with the molecular method was found after the multi-fibre EN period compared with the fibre-free EN period. There were no concomitant changes in the dominant groups of intestinal bacteria.

CONCLUSION:

In long-term EN patients, a polymeric enteral formula supplemented with a mixture of six fibres increases faecal SCFAs and total number of bacteria, which may contribute to an improved bowel function.

PMID:
16253403
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2005.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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