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Clin Rehabil. 2005 Oct;19(7):714-24.

Impairment-oriented training or Bobath therapy for severe arm paresis after stroke: a single-blind, multicentre randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany. tplatz@zedat.fu-berlin.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the effects of augmented exercise therapy time for arm rehabilitation as either Bobath therapy or the impairment-oriented training (Arm BASIS training) in stroke patients with arm severe paresis.

DESIGN:

Single blind, multicentre randomized control trial.

SETTING:

Three inpatient neurorehabilitation centres.

SUBJECTS:

Sixty-two anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients.

INTERVENTIONS:

Random assignment to three group: (A) no augmented exercise therapy time, (B) augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy and (C) augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training.

MAIN MEASURES:

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Fugl-Meyer arm motor score. Secondary measure: Action Research Arm Test (ARA). Ancillary measures: Fugl-Meyer arm sensation and joint motion/pain scores and the Ashworth Scale (elbow flexors).

RESULTS:

An overall effect of augmented exercise therapy time on Fugl-Meyer scores after four weeks was not corroborated (mean and 95% confidence interval (CI) of change scores: no augmented exercise therapy time (n=20) 8.8, 5.2-12.3; augmented exercise therapy time (n=40) 9.9, 6.8-13.9; p = 0.2657). The group who received the augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training (n=20) had, however, higher gains than the group receiving the augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy (n=20) (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath 7.2, 2.6-11.8; BASIS 12.6, 8.4-16.8; p = 0.0432). Passive joint motion/pain deteriorated less in the group who received BASIS training (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath -3.2, -5.2 to -1.1; BASIS 0.1, -1.8-2.0; p = 0.0090). ARA, Fugl-Meyer arm sensation, and Ashworth Scale scores were not differentially affected.

CONCLUSIONS:

The augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training enhanced selective motor control. Type of training was more relevant for recovery of motor control than therapeutic time spent.

PMID:
16250190
DOI:
10.1191/0269215505cr904oa
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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