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J Food Prot. 2005 Oct;68(10):2059-67.

Evaluation of small-scale hot-water postpackaging pasteurization treatments for destruction of Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat beef snack sticks and natural-casing wieners.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1565, USA. scingham@wisc.edu

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate small-scale hot-water postpackaging pasteurization (PPP) as a postlethality (post-cooking) treatment for Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat beef snack sticks and natural-casing wieners. Using a commercially available plastic packaging film specifically designed for PPP applications and 2.8 liters of boiling water (100 degrees C) in a sauce pan on a hot plate, an average reduction in L. monocytogenes numbers of > or = 2 log units was obtained using heating times of 1.0 min for individually packaged beef snack sticks (three brands) and 4.0 min for packages of four sticks (two brands) and seven sticks (three brands). Average product surface temperatures, measured as soon as possible after PPP and opening the package, were 47 to 51.5, 58 to 61.5, and 58.5 to 61 degrees C for the beef snack sticks packages of one, four, and seven sticks per package, respectively. A treatment of 7.0 min for packages of four natural-casing wieners (three brands) achieved L. monocytogenes reductions of > or = 1.0 log unit and average product surface temperature of 60.5 to 63.5 degrees C. Cooked-out fat and moisture resulting from tested treatments ranged from 0.2 to 1.1% by weight for beef snack sticks and from 0.4 to 1.2% by weight for natural-casing wieners. For natural-casing wieners, PPP had no detrimental effect on overall product desirability to consumers; results suggested that PPP may significantly enhance appearance of this product. However, for beef snack sticks the cooking out of fat and moisture during PPP had a significant negative effect on consumer opinions of product appearance.

PMID:
16245708
DOI:
10.4315/0362-028x-68.10.2059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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