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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;60(2):155-62.

The effect of MTHFR(C677T) genotype on plasma homocysteine concentrations in healthy children is influenced by gender.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Nutrition and Clinical Dietetics, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece. tina.papoutsakis@hua.gr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the influence of gender, together with folate status, on the relation between the common methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism and plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in healthy children.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study by face-to-face interview.

SETTING AND SUBJECTS:

A total of 186 sixth-grade students participated from twelve randomly selected primary schools in Volos, Greece.

METHODS:

Fasting tHcy, folate, and vitamin B(12) were measured in plasma. The MTHFR genotypes were determined. Anthropometric and dietary intake data by 24-h recall were collected.

RESULTS:

Geometric means for plasma tHcy, plasma folate and energy-adjusted dietary folate did not differ between females and males. The homozygous mutant TT genotype was associated with higher tHcy only in children with lower plasma folate concentrations (<19.9 nmol/l, P = 0.012). As a significant gender interaction was observed (P = 0.050), we stratified the lower plasma folate group by gender and found that the association between the genotype and tHcy was restricted to males (P = 0.026). Similar results were obtained when folate status was based on estimated dietary folate. Specifically, only TT males that reported lower dietary folate consumption (<37 microg/MJ/day) had tHcy that was significantly higher than tHcy levels of C-allele carriers (P = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Under conditions of lower folate status (as estimated by either plasma concentration or reported dietary consumption), gender modifies the association of the MTHFR(C677T) polymorphism with tHcy concentrations in healthy children.

SPONSORSHIP:

Kellog Europe.

PMID:
16234842
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602280
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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