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Appl Opt. 2005 Oct 1;44(28):6049-57.

Multiple-scattering effects on infrared scattering measurements used to characterize droplet size and volume fraction distributions in diesel sprays.

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1
Division of Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401-1887, USA.

Abstract

We quantify the maximum error due to multiple-scattering effects for an infrared scattering droplet izing technique. Errors in Sauter mean diameters (SMDs) and liquid volume fractions were estimated lased on experimentally determined polarization properties of the scattered light. Light that is multiply scattered from spherical particles becomes randomly polarized, whereas singly scattered light from a spherical particle contains no cross-polarization scattering component. Therefore measurement of the cross-polarization component (in this case parallel) of the scattering signal is a measure of the multiply scattered light. A ratio of parallel to perpendicular polarized scattered light was experimentally determined and used to calculate an error due to multiple scattering. The infrared scattering measurements and polarization measurements used to quantify the multiple-scattering errors were applied to a typical diesel spray that was injected into three different background conditions: a room ambient condition; a room-temperature, high-pressure condition; and a combusting condition. Droplet SMD, liquid volume fraction, and multiple-scattering errors were determined for a number of locations within the spray; results indicate that the combusting case is negligibly affected by multiple scattering. However, the room ambient case exhibited notable errors due to multiple scattering near the centerline of the spray, and the high-pressure case demonstrated susceptibility to multiple scattering throughout all regions investigated. It is important to note, however, that multiple-scattering errors in many cases translate into relatively small effects on the reported droplet sizes.

PMID:
16231812
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