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Nefrologia. 2005;25(4):381-6.

[Pharmacogenetics of angiotensin system in non diabetic nephropathy].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Genética Molecular, Hospital Central de Asturias e Instituto Reina Sofía de Investigación Nefrológica, eliecer.coto@sespa.princast.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Genetic variability could contribute to the response to pharmacological treatment in patients with nephropathy. In albuminuric diabetic patients the renoprotective effect of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition should be lower among homozygotes for the deletion allele (DD) compared to II-homozygotes.

METHODS:

A total of 71 non-diabetic chronic nephropathy patients were treated with losartan (n = 37) or amlodipine (n = 34). Blood pressure and proteinuria were determined before and after the treatment, and changes in the mean values were statistically compared. Patients were genotyped for the ACE-I/D, angiotensin I receptor type 1 (AGTR1)-1166 A/C, and angiotensinogen (AGT)-M235T polymorphims, and the reduction of blood pressure and proteinuria between the different genotypes were compared.

RESULTS:

The reduction in systolic or diastolic blood pressure was not found to be different between the ACE-I/D or AGT-M/T genotypes in patients treated with losartan or amlodipine. In patients treated with losartan, we found a significantly higher reduction of diastolic blood pressure in AGTR1-AA patients compared to AC patients (p = 0,0024). We did not find differences in proteinuria-reduction between the different genotypes in patients treated with losartan or amlodipine.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data show that the effects of losartan and amlodipine on the absolute mean reduction of blood pressure and proteinuria in non-diabetic nephropathy patients are similar between the different ACE or AGT genotypes. Although based on a small number of patients, the AGTR1-AA genotype was associated with a significantly higher reduction in diastolic blood pressure among losartan-treated patients. Additional studies are necessary to refute or confirm this association.

PMID:
16231503
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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