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Urology. 2005 Oct;66(4):888-91.

Blood transfusion and resuscitation using penile corpora: an experimental study.

Author information

1
Urology Department, Assiut University Hospital, Assiut, Egypt. abolyosr@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To test the feasibility of using the penile corpora cavernosa for blood transfusion and resuscitation purposes.

METHODS:

Three male donkeys were used for autologous blood transfusion into the corpus cavernosum during three sessions with a 1-week interval between each. Two blood units (450 mL each) were transfused per session to each donkey. Moreover, three dogs were bled up until a state of shock was produced. The mean arterial blood pressure decreased to 60 mm Hg. The withdrawn blood (mean volume 396.3 mL) was transfused back into their corpora cavernosa under 150 mm Hg pressure. Different transfusion parameters were assessed. The Assiut faculty of medicine ethical committee approved the study before its initiation.

RESULTS:

For the donkey model, the mean time of blood collection was 12 minutes. The mean time needed to establish corporal access was 22 seconds. The mean time of blood transfusion was 14.2 minutes. The mean rate of blood transfusion was 31.7 mL/min. Mild penile elongation with or without mild penile tumescence was observed on four occasions. All penile shafts returned spontaneously to their pretransfusion state at a maximum of 5 minutes after cessation of blood transfusion. No extravasation, hematoma formation, or color changes occurred. Regarding the dog model, the mean rate of transfusion was 35.2 mL/min. All dogs were resuscitated at the end of the transfusion.

CONCLUSIONS:

The corpus cavernosum is a feasible, simple, rapid, and effective alternative route for blood transfusion and venous access. It can be resorted to whenever necessary. It is a reliable means for volume replacement and resuscitation in males.

PMID:
16230176
DOI:
10.1016/j.urology.2005.04.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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